In this short article I will follow up on the ways to look at gold sentiment to judge whether it is a good time to buy or sell gold (or sit on your hands). This time we see how portfolio analysts look at gold to see if they are too enthusiastic or too negative.

According to Hulbert at MarketWatch, “that huge two-day drop in late August did scare a lot of erstwhile bulls into becoming almost stubbornly bearish — which, from a contrarian point of view, is bullish. As a result, even though gold bullion is now back within shouting distance of its August highs, gold market sentiment remains remarkable subdued.”

They write that the average recommended gold market exposure among a subset of the shortest-term gold market timers currently stands at 40.3%. While it stood at a much higher 67% in late July.

So even though gold has climbed $300 and 18% since July portfolio managers are more negative (or less positive) now. Since the typical pattern is for gold timers to become more bullish as the market rises, and vice versa, this development is bullish from a contrarian point of view.

gold sentiment bullish chart